You never know what you’ll find…

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Second hand shops (not second hand Book Shops) can be a treasure trove of old books. Second hand Book Store owners tend to know their stuff and price their books accordingly, where as general second hand shop keepers are not always as well versed in the value of old books that pass through their hands.

I have amassed books, as opposed to “collected” books in the past. I select books that I like the look of the cover or the review or subject matter or author and I tend to rarely throw any of them away…..even the bad ones.

That was until I read a book called “A Pound of Paper” – (subtitled Confessions of a Book Addict) by Australian author John Baxter. It chronicles his book entwined life. How he became a writer – in his teens…as a protest to poorly written Sci-Fi stories in a magazine – and how, via working in the book trade he became a collector of books…..initially by Graham Greene. His collection is now a vast library of first editions and author signed books – probably worth thousands of dollars.

His work took him from Australia to the UK and the USA, but he now lives with his French wife, in Paris, on Rue de l’Odeon – in the same building once occupied by Sylvia Beach – owner of the original Shakespeare & Company book store. The building is steeped in literary history, having been visited by Gloria Steine, Ernest Hemingway and Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald to name but a few of the famous literary figures to have graced its halls.

John has written biographies about famous movie stars and directors including Woody Allen and Robert de Niro, but these days tends to write books about the love of his life….the City of Paris and it’s literary history. Indeed John also conducts walking tours of his favourite literary haunts in Paris – the tours ending at his apartment building where guests are invited upstairs for lunch and can view his vast collection of books.

To get an idea of Johns depth of knowledge about Paris and the famous writers who have lived and worked there I suggest reading either of his books “The most beautiful walk in the World” or “Five Nights in Paris” – a book about Paris after dark. These are just two of John’s books about Paris…there are many more.

It’s only a few months ago that I read my first John Baxter book – “A pound of paper” – which I thought was a very well written, knowledgeable book about books, the book trade and book collecting. He’s very easy to read and his writing flows in such a way that before you know it you’ve finished the book….and are looking for his next one. I’ve since read three others and am eager for more. He’s a treat to read.

It is his passion for collecting books that made me look more carefully at the books that I buy…..and to look for bargain investments in second hand shops. Just this month I acquired – a 3 volume set of Finden’s Illustrations of Lord Byron’s Life & Works. Vol 1 and 2 printed in 1833 and vol 3 in 1834 – for the princely sum of NZ$15. On checking on AbeBooks.com the same books are currently selling for between US$250 and US$500. Although it is tempting, I won’t be selling the books, but will take my time in reading them and then who knows…they may be the first books in my “serious” book collection.

As I said, you never know what you’ll find in second hand shops. Happy hunting!

 

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Featherston Booktown is now official.

I’m very pleased to report that as of October 2nd 2018 the small, lower north island, New Zealand town of Featherston has become a full member of the International Organisation of Booktowns (IOB). This makes Featherston the first Booktown in New Zealand and the 22nd Booktown internationally.

A Booktown is a small rural town or village in which second–hand and antiquarian bookshops are concentrated. Most Booktowns have developed in villages of historic interest or of scenic beauty. They have usually had a hard time economically and have turned to the Booktown idea in a bid to turn around the economic downturn.

Gunnel Ottersten, President of the IOB said: ”The IOB has observed with great interest the successful growth of Featherston Booktown over the last four years. The Featherston Booktown Board of Trustees and the Featherston community have done a fantastic job taking Featherston Booktown forward to its current impressive stage – and the IOB voted unanimously to make Featherston Booktown a full member of the IOB.’

Peter Biggs, Chair of the Featherston Booktown Board of Trustees said that the whole of Featherston had been behind them 100% in their bid to become a Booktown and it is a proud moment to finally achieve their goal.  It will also give Featherston the opportunity to promote itself internationally as a Booktown and add significant value and innovation to all of the other Booktowns around the world.

Featherston is currently home to six bookshops and now it has become officially accepted into the family of the IOB, could well attract more potential booksellers.

The concept of the Booktown was initiated by Richard Booth in Hay–on–Wye in Wales. Hay has a population of only 1500 people, yet is home to around two dozen bookshops. In comparison, the population of Featherston is over two thousand so the potential to add more bookshops is not simply pie in the sky.

Booktowns have proved extremely popular with book lovers and tourists alike overseas. The Hay–on–Wye Literature Festival now attracts over 80,000 visitors across ten days in May-June every year. A phenomenal number when the usual population size is considered.

Similarly, Scotland’s Booktown, Wigtown – population of less than one thousand people, yet around a dozen bookshops, have benefited increasingly over the 20 years since being hailed as Scotland’s Booktown. The 10 day festival held in 2017 was said to have generated over 3 million UK Pounds. This years is just finishing and figures are expected to be up on last year.

I was in Featherston at the end of August this year to attend an authors event at which Wigtown’s unofficial Booktown Champion Shaun Bythell – owner of Scotland’s biggest second hand bookshop – was promoting his own book “The Diary of a Bookseller”. The book takes a look at a typical year in the life of a bookseller (Shaun) – recording the daily and often humorous exchanges between himself, his staff and customers.

I loved the book, met the writer and found him to be a charming, witty and intelligent human being, with the voice of a 1950’s BBC presenter, a very casual sense of fashion style bordering on “op-shop” and a mop-top of unruly orange hair. He’s a very likable sort of guy – self depreciating, yet confident. The event received an audience of over a hundred and twenty people eager to meet the man and to listen to readings from the book, listen to rib-tickling tales of book-shop life and to take part in a question and answer time. Bear in mind that this was on a cold winter Monday evening in a tiny rural town. The weekend before, he had been in Auckland and had a smaller audience. It goes to show that Featherston is ready to step up in literary circles.

Featherstons next literary festival runs from 9th to 12th of May 2019. I for one will make sure it’s on my calendar. Achieving the title of Booktown along with the upcoming festival and other events throughout the year should help to put Featherston firmly on the tourist map.

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Above photo – the writer (on the left) with author Shaun Bythell